Empty nest syndrome

Occupied house undergoing a Sumitomo makeover

A Kyodo news report carried by the March 18 issue of the Tokyo Shimbun clarified an important point in the discussion of abandoned or otherwise empty homes in Japan, vernacularly referred to as “akiya.” According to a survey of 700,000 properties throughout Japan conducted by the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications, 46.4 percent of akiya are at least 50 years old. Moreover, among the reasons given by present owners for not having unloaded the properties or demolishing them, 52 percent said they had inherited them or received them as gifts and, essentially, didn’t know what to do with them. As years passed, neglect took its toll, and in many cases if not most, the homes, especially if they are single-family houses, have become uninhabitable.

Five years ago the central government enacted a special housing law that would compel local governments to manage vacant properties more proactively. According to Kyodo, the government is now going to “check the effectiveness of the law” in order to see whether it should be revised or supplemented. As of October 2018, the last time the land ministry released findings from its national housing and land survey, which it conducts every five years, the number of vacant homes stood at 8.489 million. That includes apartments and condos that have not been occupied for at least one year. According to the government, there are 12 percent more akiya than there were when the survey was conducted in 2008. In addition, 14 percent of all homes in Japan right now qualify as akiya, and the ministry estimates that 40 percent are “abandoned,” meaning they are permanently unoccupied. Last year, Nomura Research Institute projected that by 2033, the number of akiya would increase to 19.55 million, or 30 percent of all homes in Japan.

In a related story, Nikkei Business Daily’s March 15 edition explained Sumitomo Realty and Development’s new project to exploit vacant single-family houses. The project accepts orders for renovations of derelict houses in order to turn them into share houses (i.e., homes with multiple residents who share common spaces), minpaku (guest houses or airbnb properties), or social welfare facilities. Sumitomo has a lot of experience in the home renovation business through its Shinchiku Sokkuri-san brand home “reform” service. “Shinchiku sokkuri-san” roughly translates as “making an old house look just like a newly built one.” Since the service started in 1996, Sumitomo has renovated about 130,000 houses, and is now working on expanding the business to include renovations that turn old single-family houses into share houses or guest houses.

Sumitomo’s target with regard to akiya are wooden houses, which number about 2.39 million. The land ministry says that about 480,000 akiya in Japan that are judged to be easily renovatable are also located within one kilometer of the nearest train station, making them easily sellable after going through the reform process. Last year, the government relaxed the building standards law so that usage of a structure could be changed more easily, for instance from residential usage to commercial usage. Consequently, Sumitomo wants to turn some of these old family houses into airbnbs or share houses or even restaurants/cafes. Sumitomo, in fact, projects that its revenues for reform business will amount to ¥123 billion in fiscal 2020, a 6 percent increase over fiscal 2019. So there may be some life in those old empty houses after all.

4 comments

  1. Michael Fogarty · 8 Days Ago

    Thank you for this. I am very interested in one of these homes. Appreciate all the time and effort you put into finding and publishing these articles. Does one go through a fudosan to find these?

    Like

    • catforehead · 8 Days Ago

      That’s a good question. Since akiya are, by definition, homes that have been vacant for a long period of time it’s likely that realtors don’t handle them, since they don’t think they can sell them. Still, you could check a random real estate agent and ask and find out their policy. Or go to a city hall and find the land division and see if they know of any akiya in their bailiwick. Also, many local governments have “akiya banks,” which are kind of exchange centers for vacant houses. Just do a search for 空き家バンク and append the name of the city where you’re looking.

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  2. chrisd197 · 8 Days Ago

    @Michael Fogarty
    You can start with Furusato Kaiki Shien Centre (https://www.furusatokaiki.net), a Tokyo-based non-profit that provides information about abandoned rural homes

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    • Michael Fogarty · 7 Days Ago

      That is very kind of you Chris. I would like to stay in Chiba not terribly far (10k) from Goi eki. I really appreciate you taking the time. I will enjoy doing this with my wife.

      Like

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